Basement Bettas

Raising Show Quality Bettas

Feeding White Worms

My last post was on starting and keeping a White Worm culture. If you cruise the net you will find that most people will harvest the worms by taking something like a plastic cd case, spritz it with water and sprinkle a food on it. They will then place this food side down on the white worm’s soil. The next day they remove the plastic and rinse the worms into a bowl of water. They then use a dropper to suck up the worms and feed to their fish. I tried that and several variations of that, and it just was too much a pain to do every day. So, ever the mad scientist I played around until this is how I now harvest my white worms.

The next time you are at Wal-Mart, go to the kitchen gadget isle and pick up some of these stainless condiment cups. I think they are like four for $1. Get several.. they are very handy in the fish room. I fed my worms the previous day so I use my spoon to dig gently around where I buried food. You will see piles of worms.. scoop with the spoon and place them into the cup until it is full. Then, take a mister, and spritz the top of the soil a few times. You want it damp but not soaking wet. Tap water is fine to use.

Then, take another cup and cover the cup of worms. Once covered just set them aside for a bit. Spritzing the soil is going to reduce the amount of oxygen in the soil and the worms are going to head for the top. Keeping a cover over the top will make more of them surface as the worms prefer the darkness.. and keep the worms in the cups. It is not unusual for the worms to be bunched up in the top cup as well. Leave the top off and you can end up with worms all over the counter. Don’t ask me how I know..

Before long the worms will start to come to the surface. This photo was taken about 30 minutes after spritzing the worms with water. It does take some time to harvest the worms this way, so you may want to make this a second or third feeding. I feed another type of food first thing in the morning and prepare the worms at the same time.

Then, in the afternoon, I have a ready snack of fat white worms to treat my Bettas. This photo was taken about 2 hours after the worms were spritzed. Because they are on the top of the soil, they are clean and very easy to feed. If you leave them too long you will get dead worms.. so feed them within a few hours of doing this.

To feed, I use a pair of tweezers to grab a few worms and drop them into the Betta containers. My Bettas love them so much I have a few that will jump out of the water to grab the worms off the tweezers. You can even use the tweezers to dig into the soil and grab additional worms that have not made it to the surface. Usually, I am not able to get all the worms out of the dirt, so I just dump what’s left back into a worm culture. Because it is wetter then the worm culture soil, I dump it in a corner and the next day I stir it back into the mix when I flip the culture. The worms have migrated out of it and it dries a bit so is much easier to work back into the soil. The stainless cups are easy to wash and use over and over again. Though not instant, this method produceds lots of very clean worms to feed your fish.

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December 13, 2009 - Posted by | Feeding, Live Foods | , ,

2 Comments »

  1. I was just looking at IBC info and found your site. I had shown bettas in the 90′s and was looking.
    I am into guppies now and feed grindle worms and use a plastic screen to harvest them. I put a small sq. on top of the dirt and put food on the top of the screen and the worms come on the screen to feed and stay there, works great for me and it should work for white worms to. I can send a picture of it ifyou would like. Put fish in the title if you do because of spam.
    Good luck,
    Howard in Iowa

    Comment by Howard Broderson | September 9, 2010 | Reply

    • What a neat idea! Is it like the stuff they cross stitch with? My worms crashed in the move to Texas so I am waiting till it cools down a bit to get some more. They fish really put on size when you start feeding them. Thanks for the tip.

      Comment by Basement Bettas | September 9, 2010 | Reply


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